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Phoenix Public Speaking coaching and workshops

Archive for business presentation skills – Page 15

Quotable Quotes

“Good communication is as stimulating as black coffee, and just as hard to sleep after.” ~ Anne Lindbergh

Public Speaking Students Learn Skills for the Real World

It was exciting and inspiring to see so many of my former public speaking students graduate this week from Brown Mackie College in Phoenix. Following the ceremony, I had the opportunity to congratulate and chat with them for a few moments about their experiences. Many told me that what they learned in my public speaking class was already paying off as they begin to do job interviews. Others said the skills they learned are helping them communicate better in the workplace. Some said the skills they learned were even helping them in their interpersonal relationships. All said they were thankful they took the course. It was a very rewarding experience hearing that what they learned was helping them as they prepare to tackle the real world.

I was so proud of my students for overcoming their fears and becoming better presenters. And I learned as much from them as they did from me. In addition to the normal fears of public speaking, some of them faced additional challenges including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorder, and speech impediments. I will remember all of them for their perseverance and their accomplishments. The student pictured with me above was among the most memorable. She was so determined to deliver her persuasive speech the day after her lung surgery that she did so from her hospital bed via Skype. That set the bar pretty high!

The graduation ceremony was bittersweet. Brown Mackie College is closing and this was the last commencement ceremony ever. But that did not dampen the spirits of the Class of 2017. Congratulations graduates! Best of luck and may all of your speeches be great ones!

Tip No. 8: Preparation Helps Reduce Fear

In my 20-year career working at six major corporations, I witnessed many people who were passed over for promotions. Many found their ideas were not taken seriously. They just didn’t seem like “management material.” Most of them had the knowledge they needed to do the job. So why didn’t they advance in their careers? Answer: the fear of public speaking. They lacked the confidence to speak up and the communication skills to stand out, and it cost them.

Conversely, I’ve seen people who were very good talkers but didn’t necessarily have as much knowledge as others on their work teams. They often times were taken more seriously and got promotions they perhaps didn’t deserve. Ideally, those who advance in life should be good communicators and know what the heck they are talking about.

Don’t let fear paralyze your career. Before you can gain the confidence to speak and learn the skills to stand out in this highly competitive world, you have to first put fear in your rear view mirror.

You can begin to eliminate your fears of public speaking long before you step to the front of the room to deliver your business presentation or speech. You can take steps in the preparation phase that will reduce stress, anxiety and your fears of failure.

Preparing for Your Presentation

A speech or presentation begins as soon as you accept the assignment. That’s when you begin to do your audience analysis, content development and rehearsals.

  1. Practice, practice, practice! There is no substitute. Practice aloud. Practice in front of a mirror. Practice in front of your friends or family. Record yourself. Have someone else read your speech to you.
  2. Memorize your outline, not your speech. This will allow you to speak more authentically and appear to be more credible.
  3. Believe at least one thing in your speech will be meaningful to at least one person in the audience. That’s not a high hurdle. But if you do not believe that with all your heart then you have two choices: rewrite your speech until you do believe it or stay home.
  4. Make a packing list so you don’t forget handouts, visual aids, etc.
  5. If you have presentation materials, scripts, or any technology, have a backup plan. Technology can and will fail.
  6. Come prepared with a small bottle of room temperature water and throat drops. Keep them handy while you’re speaking. A coughing fit can ruin a presentation.
  7. Remove coins, keys, etc. from your pockets. If you fidget with a ring or watch when you’re nervous, remove the distraction.

The more prepared you are, the less fearful you will be. We will look at additional steps to overcome public speaking fears future posts. So, don’t be afraid to check back frequently!

Related Post: No. 1 Fear: Public Speaking

 

 

No. 1 Fear: Public Speaking

Are you afraid of public speaking? Well, you’re not alone, as illustrated in the humorous clip above from Jerry Seinfeld. Year after year, the fear of public speaking ranks No. 1 in study after study.

There’s even a fancy word to describe the fear of public speaking – glossophobia. Gloss comes from the Greek word for tongue and phobia, of course, is Greek for fear.

In our next post, we’ll present some tips to deal with anxiety and the fears you face when doing public speaking or making business presentations. But for now, know that you are not alone and help is on the way!

 

TED Talks Parody

I love TED Talks but this is a hysterically funny must-see parody for anyone who does public speaking or business presentations.

Quotable Quotes

“There are always three speeches, for every one you actually gave. The one you practiced, the one you gave, and the one you wish you gave.” ~ Dale Carnegie

Quotable Quotes

“The best way to conquer stage fright is to know what you’re talking about.” ~ Michael H. Mescon

Tip #6: Remove Distractions

“The success of your presentation will be judged not by the knowledge you send but by what the listener receives.” ~ Lilly Walters

Nervous ticks make you look less confident and make your message seem less credible. If you fiddle with a ring or watch while speaking, simply remove the objects. Likewise, empty change from your pockets. You could try to remember not to fidget with these objects, but you have enough to remember when you are presenting. Remove the distractions, remove the worry.

A Little Authentic Mr. Chicken in All of Us

I first saw legendary comedic actor Don Knotts present this hilarious “hero” speech in the above movie clip when “The Ghost and Mr. Chicken” debuted in 1966. I was only 6 years old but even then I could clearly understand how scary it would be to have to go onstage to speak with the entire town looking at you. This movie continues to be one of my all-time favorites and the “hero” speech continues to resonate with me all these many years later.

There are so many mistakes Knott’s character, Luther Heggs, makes in this speech: his poor attempt at humor, his loose leaf script blows away, he has a heckler, the microphone has feedback issues, and he doesn’t know how to stand or how to control his nervous energy. But one thing saves this speech from being an unmitigated disaster: authenticity. Luther Heggs is who he is. His transparency and sincerity shine through in this speech and throughout the movie. He’s genuine and therefore credible. Audiences are very forgiving of mistakes made by sincere speakers. (Spoiler Alert: He beats out a slick rival and gets the girl in the end because of his authenticity.)

Authenticity always has been important in speech-making (and in fact in all communications) but it is even more important in the Digital Age. We’ve grown tired and beyond skepticism of overproduced, slick presentations as evidenced by the success of reality TV, SnapChat, and YouTube. The message that resonated with movie audiences in 1966 that still resonates today is this: be yourself. Atta boy Luther!